Brackenwood Gallery

A gallery on Whidbey Island, WA representing the very best in fine arts and crafts from the pacific northwest.

Skill, Expertise and Talented Artists Create an Exceptional Show!

I woke up this morning thinking about Kevin Horan’s photographs of the sky taken from 30,000 feet above the earth. A woman mentioned yesterday, as she was looking at his pictures, that not that long ago these photos would not have been possible. Frankly Horan’s images are extraordinary even in today’s world. Window Seat #4, Photograph, Kevin Horan

First, the plane is moving… FAST! How does one capture an image that is not blurry? Second, where is the glare from the plane, the window, the overhead lights reflecting off the window? Nowhere. Obviously Kevin is a professional photographer and has the skill to account for these obstacles but still, these photos are rare beauties. And they inspire wonder.

The sky looks different with less atmosphere; colors are more intense. Horan captures the experience of weightlessness yet grounds us with the patchworked landscapes of the Midwest from a bird’s eye view. The undiscerning eye could overlook these window seat photos but those who love to travel, enjoy the sensation of flying through the clouds or appreciate the fine art of photography will want to take one of this stunning photographs home with them to enjoy for a lifetime.

Pont Alexandre III, Photograph, Lorraine Healy19webFIX

 

Photography is a wonderful art form. Just the idea that you can capture what the eye is seeing at any instant in time with a camera is magical. Lorraine Healy’s photo of the giant water nymph on the Pont Alexandra in Paris is an enchanting example. This huge woman seems like she is turning around to tell you something! She’s so happy and excited. I love that Lorraine captured not only the beauty of the nymph but also the feeling the artist who sculpted her achieved. It’s not a snapshot, its intentionally one artist illuminating another artist’s work bringing it to life joyfully for the viewer.

 

 

Pinhole Study #4, Photograph,  Zoë  Osenbach

What I love about Zoe Osenbach’s pinhole images is that they are NOT capturing an instant in time. The water in the Venetian canals has the feeling of movement, because it was moving during the 8 minutes it took to take the photo! The photos created by the light piercing through a tiny hole emblazing an image onto the paper hidden in the box, is a process as old as photography itself and the results are lovely. Sun streaked sky, shimmering water and the still strength of the ancient buildings in Venice make for incredible composition and captivating photographs.

 

 

Berber Tents, Photograph, Earl Olsen

 

 

Earl Olsen’s images of Morocco are stunning. His painterly eye captures the world he sees in such unique and artistic ways. My favorite is looking out an exquisitely carved and painted doorway to the desert with Berber tents in the distance. The contrast of the opulent and elegant interior with the simple yet stunning exterior combined with the angle the photo is shot creates the art that is photography. It is not chance, it is skill and a great eye!

 

 

 

Turquoise Door, Oil, Rene Flynn Federspiel

If you haven’t had a chance to see Rene Flynn Federspiel’s elegant doorways of Italy, come on in. Rene’s ability to capture stone through the medium of oil paint is amazing. Rich texture contrasts with smooth surfaces illuminating the different kinds of stone in the architecture. Her use of bright colors accentuates the gradations of gray in the cornices and steps on the buildings. Seeing Italy through Rene’s eyes is refreshing because she captures the serenity of the places she visited and allows us to sit with her there.

 

This truly exceptional show is a shining example of the skills and expertise of these amazing artists. The exhibit continues through March 31. Come on this journey with us!

 

Brackenwood Gallery   |   302 First Street   |   Langley, WA   |   98260   |   360-221-2978   |   brackenwoodgallery@whidbey.com

 


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