Brackenwood Gallery

A gallery on Whidbey Island, WA representing the very best in fine arts and crafts from the pacific northwest.

Fall Trunk Show

Just in time for the holidays, Cheryl Kamera, Marjorie Burr, and Rebecca Bashara take over the gallery for a pop-up trunk show. This is a fantastic opportunity to meet the artists, and to see a more extensive collection of their work than we normally have on display, including some rare and one-of-a-kind pieces. Sip prosecco and spend some time getting to know the artists while you shop for yourself or for others. Saturday November 26th, 1- 5 pm

Just in time for the holidays, Cheryl Kamera, Marjorie Burr, and Rebecca Bashara take over the gallery for a pop-up trunk show.
This is a fantastic opportunity to meet the artists, and to see a more extensive collection of their work than we normally have on display, including some rare and one-of-a-kind pieces.

Sip prosecco and spend some time getting to know the artists while you shop for yourself or for others.

Saturday November 26th, 1- 5 pm

Cheryl Kamera began working with dyes and textiles during the tie-dye era of the late sixties. At first she used dyes from the grocery store, the same ones used by her mother to change the color of the curtains. As her passion grew, she began to grasp the potential of what one could do with dyes and cloth. Always curious about the natural world, she pursued a science education that led to a professional career in environmental chemistry. This fit well with her interest in dyes, and gave her a deeper understanding of dye processes. Over the years she has been privileged to study with many artists, among them world-renowned dyers and textile designers including Ana Lisa Hedstrom, Joan Morris, Elin Noble, Polly Stirling, Yoshiko, Wada, and Michele Wipplinger.

Cheryl Kamera began working with dyes and textiles during the tie-dye era of the late sixties. At first she used dyes from the grocery store, the same ones used by her mother to change the color of the curtains. As her passion grew, she began to grasp the potential of what one could do with dyes and cloth. Always curious about the natural world, she pursued a science education that led to a professional career in environmental chemistry. This fit well with her interest in dyes, and gave her a deeper understanding of dye processes. Over the years she has been privileged to study with many artists, among them world-renowned dyers and textile designers including Ana Lisa Hedstrom, Joan Morris, Elin Noble, Polly Stirling, Yoshiko, Wada, and Michele Wipplinger.

Rebecca Bashara's designs reverberate with the peace, freedom, and spontaneity of a walk on the beach, a hike along a river trail, a climb up a mountain peak, or a meditation in the deepest of woods. Her jewelry contains stones from the Puget Sound (many collected on Whidbey Island) and the Columbia River Gorge, where Rebecca lives and works in rural Klickatat, Washington. The fact that her creativity springs from her everyday life is apparent if you visit her. Her house is her studio: smooth shimmering stones lie drying in her bathtub and sink; her kitchen table is a rotating mosaic of shapes, colors, and textures; stones and metal gather in heaps and mounds, stirring for Rebecca to cut and work them into artistic pieces of adornment.

Rebecca Bashara's designs reverberate with the peace, freedom, and spontaneity of a walk on the beach, a hike along a river trail, a climb up a mountain peak, or a meditation in the deepest of woods. Her jewelry contains stones from the Puget Sound (many collected on Whidbey Island) and the Columbia River Gorge, where Rebecca lives and works in rural Klickatat, Washington. The fact that her creativity springs from her everyday life is apparent if you visit her. Her house is her studio: smooth shimmering stones lie drying in her bathtub and sink; her kitchen table is a rotating mosaic of shapes, colors, and textures; stones and metal gather in heaps and mounds, stirring for Rebecca to cut and work them into artistic pieces of adornment.

Marjorie Burr makes lamp worked beads today in much the same way they were made in ancient times.  The beads are created one at a time working in a open flame.  She loves the solitude and focus of the process. She enjoys the heat and the fluid molten glass, and exercising her craft makes her feel part of the continuum of bead makers that dates back to early human history.  She hopes you sense all that when you wear her beads...that would complete the cycle.

Marjorie Burr makes lamp worked beads today in much the same way they were made in ancient times.  The beads are created one at a time working in a open flame.  She loves the solitude and focus of the process. She enjoys the heat and the fluid molten glass, and exercising her craft makes her feel part of the continuum of bead makers that dates back to early human history. 

She hopes you sense all that when you wear her beads...that would complete the cycle.

February 20
Revisited

 

Brackenwood Gallery   |   302 First Street   |   Langley, WA   |   98260   |   360-221-2978   |   brackenwoodgallery@whidbey.com

 


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